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waterbury connecticut

Welcome to Waterbury, Connecticut, a city that's going places. We are blessed with a highly skilled workforce, a robust infrastructure, and manufacturing companies that have re-invented themselves to adapt to the new economy. We have an administration that sees the future and knows how to manage change. Our Healthcare providers are cutting edge and our service professionals are busy.

Our neighborhoods are thriving with new schools and businesses are being motivated to come to town. But our real gift to the region is the cultural flavor that remains in the neighborhoods established by our early immigrants, which gives Waterbury its diverse personality, rich traditions, and highly engaged people. And with our community leadership and vision, we will not settle to just be the ninth largest city in New England but our goal is to become the largest "hometown" anywhere.

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Tower in photo: If you're coming to the Greater Waterbury area, one of the first landmarks you'll see is the Clock Tower of the Waterbury Republican American newspaper. This building opened in 1905 and was once a busy railroad station that served the New Haven Railroad. Designed by the well-known New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead, and White this amazing structure is designed in the Renaissance Revival style. (They also designed the great hall at Ellis Island.) C.W. Mellon, president of the New Haven Railroad, demanded the clocktower be added to the design in 1909 after seeing the Torre del Mangia on a trip to Siena, Italy. The tower's 16-foot diameter clock is considered to the be largest in New England.

In the 1950's the train station was de-commissioned and became home to The Waterbury Republican American newspaper. This paper has served area residents for more than 150 years and is among the oldest family owned and operated independent newspapers remaining in the country. A Pulitzer-prize winning paper, the Waterbury Republican American legacy owes much thanks to William Jamieson Pape who bought the twenty-year-old Waterbury Republican newspaper in 1901 and twenty-one years later, purchased the Waterbury American which had first started publishing in 1844.